Russia has started to test its 'Robocop' exo-skeleton armour that soldiers shoot machine guns ONE HANDED with 'computer-like accuracy'

August 28, 2018

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  • Suit was showcased at Army 2018 International Military and Technical Forum

  • All-black kit includes a helmet with a tinted glass visor topped with a radio cable  

  • It enhances the endurance and speed of the human soldier who wears it

  • A metal arm supports the weapons and enables precise one-handed shooting

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

 

Russia has showcased a sleek new super soldier exoskeleton that will endow the wearer with superhuman powers.

 

The suit resembles the work of science fiction, with a design reminiscent of the Stormtroopers in 'Star Wars', or the fictional mechanical police officer in 'RoboCop'.

 

The prototype military exo-skeleton purportedly allows infantry soldiers to fire machine guns using one-hand and achieve 'computer-like accuracy'.

 

Donning the suit allows soldiers to carry huge amounts of weight while also being able to run faster than would normally be physically possible.

 

Military firm TsNiiTochMash developed the Ratnik-3 'Soldier of the Future' suit which was paraded at the Army 2018 International Military and Technical Forum in Moscow.

 

Built of titanium, the exo-skeleton is designed to boost strength and stamina while a layer of body armour protects the wearer from any incoming bullets and shrapnel.

 

The skeleton fits over the torso and is secured around the waist, dispersing the weight of the built-in backpack, which can be filled up to 110 pounds (50kg).

 

Chief designer Oleg Faustov told Russian news agency TASS: 'We have already held trials for the prototype of the active exoskeleton.

 

'It really enhances a serviceman's physical abilities. For example, the tester was able to shoot from a machine-gun only with one hand and accurately hit targets.'

 

The prototype exo-suits are currently held back by one major issue - there is no room to storage a local power source. 

 

This means the suit can only be worn and used for a limited amount of time before it becomes dead weight.

 

The firm claims it will continue to improve the design before it is introduced to battlefields in 2025.

It says it is confident it will be able to address the battery issue.

A man, left, wears a working sample of a passive exoskeleton combat gear, next to a mannequin dressed in a prototype of an active exoskeleton combat gear presented by the Russian Rostec company during the International Military Technical Forum 

 

 

A sample of an active exoskeleton combat gear for special force' is presented at the forum. About 1,200 Russian defence companies and weapon manufacturers take part in the event, displaying an estimated 26,000 pieces of weaponry and military equipment

 

Russian specialists of the Rostex company present a working sample (centre) of a passive exoskeleton combat gear for special forces developed by 'TsNIIMash'

 

Demonstrating the suit was a model standing more than six-feet tall, cradling a fearsome-looking firearm in a pair of black padded gloves.

 

His arms were covered in fabric patterned with camouflage print and protected by armoured plates marked with the Russian flag.

 

On his legs were a pair of bulky shoes resembling ski boots, which were supported by a metal frame wrapped around the waist.   

 

The suit was created at the Central Research Institute for Precision Machine Building, a Moscow-based weapons development centre.

 

Its deputy chief of weapons systems, Oleg Chikarev, said last year: 'On display is our vision of the suit we would like to develop within the next couple of years.'

 

The suit was created at the Central Research Institute for Precision Machine Building, a Moscow-based weapons development centre.

 

A model standing more than six-feet tall wore the suit last year while cradling a fearsome-looking firearm in a pair of black padded gloves.

This is a side view of the combat helmet as it was shown at the exhibition at the weapons design company in Moscow

 

 

Mr Chikarev said the suit was being developed alongside several Russian companies specialising in different elements of the design.

 

He added that the suit was being developed alongside several Russian companies specialising in different elements of the design.

 

Andy Lynch, of Odin Systems, a military equipment company, told MailOnline: 'Features of the suit include a task light on the helmet for examining things like weapons and maps.

 

'It also has a pop-up display that can be used for tasks like examining a plan of the battlefield.'

 

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